Xylem in us all.

Example of a cross section of a (woody) stem. ...
Example of a cross section of a (woody) stem. Used with permission from Hydroponics – Indoor Horticulture by Jeffrey Winterborne. http://www.hydroponicist.com (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Xylem is one of the two types of transport tissue in vascular plants (phloem is the other). Its basic function is to transport water, but it also transports some nutrients through the plant.

If the xylem is the conduit for passing water and nutrients within plants,  this and any blog are also xlyem. We are the roots drawing nutrients from the soil and our thoughts to transport them to you, the flower.

I had the good fortune to take a class with a video professor in the early nineties that influenced me deeply.

Paul Ryan taught an upper level Field Production class that went beyond the traditional scope of using video cameras and microphones properly. He introduced us to the use of Ta’i Chi to control our bodies while shooting ‘hand-held’ cameras. Professional cameras you see news photographers lugging on their shoulders are pretty heavy. This approach, lowering your center of gravity and shifting your weight consciously from leg to leg, allows one to walk with a smooth glide producing less camera shake. You get a freedom of movement that a tripod cannot emulate. Your shots gain a fluidity that you can only draw on a storyboard as a curve. 

The other major focus of Ryan’s class was to bring in the concept of Earthscore to video production. He has several video examples at his site, earthscore.org.

While at the Sequatchie Vally Institute a few weeks ago, I thought of Paul while shooting this video. The camera was much smaller than the one we used back then. This video doesn’t have a lot of camera movement in it, but is full of movement. What I’m doing here is describing the water.

This is a bit of a stretch, but conceptually, the stream bed, this medium and this conversation with each other is a fluid transfer of nutrients, ideas, stories, experiences. 

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Oh, these orchids!

Red2 has a green thumb. Grandma gave us these orchids 2 years ago. Red2 kept them alive and they even bloomed again. How awesome is that? 
She has a little spritzy water bottle and everything. 
{Clue from yesterday’s post: The flowers were not in the box.}

G Gingerly Germinating Ideas for Growth – The Seed Swap 2.0

Grow! Part of the effort to create a wildlife garden full of bird feeding, seeding producing, flower-popping, goodness, is to grow some seedlings from scratch. From seeds.

Label This

Red3. Red4. Red5, Standing by.

Mrs. SF Daddy wrangled a large collection of seeds this year. Almost every year for a few years now, she’d started trays of seedlings, popped them into the ground and bam, we have tomatoes, daisies, bachelor buttons, echinacea, peppers, cucumbers, blah, blah, munch, munch, munch.
Plant this.
This year, she decided to start, not just a seed swap, but a seedling swap. She conned–I mean–enlisted her friends to start their own trays of seeds. They’d return to their own homes with trays of seeds ready to sprout. In a few weeks, they all return to the scene of the crime and trade little baby plants. Then instead of 20 or 30 of the same plants, they all leave again with a wide variety.
The plan was fool proof. Almost. The first batch of seeds was shipped to the wrong address and the seed starting party had to be postponed. (And all the way to the next full moon, if you’re following along with the posts.) 
While the first batch sprouted, we had a few intrusions! Ants in the trays!
Now that things have calmed down and we’re in April, we have lots of little babies almost ready to share and pop into the ground around the tulips. Surprise! Red2 and I planted tulip bulbs and they’re almost ready to pop!

This video will walk you through the seed starting process. Join us as we prepare to plant some seeds.
What’s growing in your garden?
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